January 18, 2018

Be Aware of What Your Kids are Doing Online

A child can be bullied, bully others, or witness bullying. Parents, teachers, and other adults may not be aware of all the digital media and apps that a child is using. The more digital platforms that a child uses, the more opportunities there are for being exposed to potential cyberbullying. 

Warning Signs a Child is Being Cyber-bullied or is Cyberbullying Others

Many of the warning signs that cyberbullying is occurring happen around a child’s use of their device. Some of the warning signs that a child may be involved in cyberbullying are: 

  • Noticeable increases or decreases in device use, including texting.

  • A child exhibits emotional responses (laughter, anger, upset) to what is happening on their device.

  • A...

January 6, 2018

There are many warning signs that may indicate that someone is affected by bullying—either being bullied or bullying others. Recognizing the warning signs is an important first step in taking action against bullying. Not all children who are bullied or are bullying others ask for help.

It is important to talk with children who show signs of being bullied or bullying others. These warning signs can also point to other issues or problems, such as depression or substance abuse. Talking to the child can help identify the root of the problem. Click here to learn more.

May 26, 2017

Cyberbullying happens when kids bully each other through electronic technology. Find out why cyberbullying is different from traditional bullying, what you can do to prevent it, and how you can report it when it happens.  

What is Cyberbullying?

Cyberbullying is bullying that takes place using electronic technology. Examples of cyberbullying include mean text messages or emails, rumors sent by email or posted on social networking sites, and embarrassing pictures, videos, websites, or fake profiles.

Prevent Cyberbullying

Parents and kids can prevent cyberbullying. Together, they can explore safe ways to use technology.

Report Cyberbullying

When cyberbullying happens, it is important to document and report the behavior so it can be addressed.    Click here to learn more

May 20, 2017

When adults respond quickly and consistently to bullying behavior they send the message that it is not acceptable. Research shows this can stop bullying behavior over time. There are simple steps adults can take to stop bullying on the spot and keep kids safe. 

  • Intervene immediately. It is OK to get another adult to help.

  • Separate the kids involved.

  • Make sure everyone is safe.

  • Meet any immediate medical or mental health needs.

  • Stay calm. Reassure the kids involved, including bystanders.

  • Model respectful behavior when you intervene.

Avoid these common mistakes: Click here to learn more

August 23, 2016

A safe and supportive school climate can help prevent bullying. Safety starts in the classroom. Students should also feel and be safe everywhere on campus—in the cafeteria, in the library, in the rest rooms, on the bus, and on the playground. Everyone at school can work together to create a climate where bullying is not acceptable.

Click here to learn more.

July 27, 2016

Children with disabilities—such as physical, developmental, intellectual, emotional, and sensory disabilities—are at an increased risk of being bullied. Any number of factors— physical vulnerability, social skill challenges, or intolerant environments—may increase the risk.  Click here to learn more.

June 18, 2016

Generally, children who are bullied have one or more of the following risk factors:

*  Are perceived as different from their peers, such as being overweight or underweight, wearing glasses or different clothing, being new to a school, or being  unable to afford what kids consider “cool”.  

*  Are perceived as weak or unable to defend themselves,

depressed, anxious, or have low self esteem

*  Are less popular than others and have few friends

*  Do not get along well with others, seen as annoying or provoking, or antagonize others for attention  Click here to learn more

June 1, 2016

 

Research shows that school administrators, such as principals, can play a powerful role in bullying prevention. They can inspire others and maintain a climate of respect and inclusion. But a principal cannot do it alone. When parents and youth are involved in the solutions:

  • Students feel safer and can focus on learning.

  • Parents worry less.

  • Teachers and staff can focus on their work.

  • Schools can develop more responsive solutions because students are more likely to see or hear about bullying than adults.

  • School climate improves because students are engaged in taking action to stop bullying.

Parents can support schools’ messages about bullying at home.

May 7, 2016

Parents play a key role in preventing and responding to bullying. If you know or suspect that your child is involved in bullying, there are several resources that may help.

Recognize the warning signs that your child is involved in bullying. They could be being bullied, bullying others, or witnessing bullying.  Learn what bullying is and what it is not. Understanding what bullying is is the first step in forming a plan to prevent or respond to bullying with your child. Many behaviors that look like bullying may be just as serious, but may require different response strategies.  

Click here to read more.

 

March 30, 2016

Cyberbullying happens when kids bully each other through electronic technology. Find out why cyberbullying is different from traditional bullying, what you can do to prevent it, and how you can report it when it happens.

 

Prevent Cyberbullying

Parents and kids can prevent cyberbullying. Together, they can explore safe ways to use technology.

 

Be Aware of What Your Kids Are Doing Online

Establish Rules about Technology Use

Understand School Rules

 

Report Cyberbullying…Click here to read more

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